Title Category Credit Event date Your cost
Antimicrobial Stewardship Module: Bacterial Infections
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
$0.00 Inappropriate antimicrobial use in hospitalized patients contributes to growing antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial-related complications and infections like Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Antimicrobial stewardship focuses on using the appropriate medication, dose, route, and duration based on patient-specific factors to avoid unnecessary use and/or overuse of antimicrobials, which contributes to healthcare costs, adverse drug events, and antimicrobial resistance. Applying antimicrobial stewardship practices in hospitalized patients has traditionally been within the domain of infection control and infectious disease experts. Frontline providers like hospitalists, however, can serve as critical partners in these efforts and can reduce the development of hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), which are increasingly caused by resistant strains. These HAIs contribute to worse patient outcomes, longer lengths of stay, and higher healthcare expenditures. In this educational module, we will explore how hospitalists can apply antimicrobial stewardship practices to improve prescribing practices for hospitalized patients, as well as recognize and reduce risk factors for hospital-acquired infections.
C. Difficile Infection
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
$0.00 Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a Gram-positive, toxin-producing, anaerobic bacillus, which is commonly responsible for antibiotic-associated diarrhea. An estimated 500 000 cases occur each year in the United States, and the incidence and severity of disease appear to be increasing. The morbidity of C. difficile infection (CDI) has risen by as much as 25% per year, and a 20-fold increase in mortality has been reported. Human transmission is through the fecal-oral route, and CDI has become the most frequently reported hospital-acquired infection, with nosocomial acquisition more than quadrupling the cost of hospitalization. Diagnosis of patients with CDI should be made based on clinical grounds in conjunction with stool testing, with the caveat that current diagnostic strategies remain imperfect. Although effective treatment is available, approximately 20% of patients suffer relapse after an initial infection; those patients with multiple prior infections face a 60% recurrence risk. Emerging therapeutics are being developed and may revolutionize therapy. Hospitalists should be knowledgeable about the clinical presentation of CDI and therapies based on disease severity. In addition, awareness of treatment strategies for patients with recurrent infections and emerging treatment options will help practitioners manage this complex disease.
Use of Data in Quality Improvement
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • Non-physician
$0.00
Patient-Centered Care
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • Non-physician
$0.00
Quality Improvement Methods: Lean and PDSA
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • Non-physician
$0.00
Hospital Quality & Patient Safety Academy
$0.00 The Hospital Quality & Patient Safety Academy is a series of modules to aid participants in improving quality and patient safety within the hospital setting. 
The Hospitalist’s Role in the Perioperative Management of Hyponatremia
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
  • ABIM MOC Self Evaluation Points
$0.00 Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality that occurs in hospitalized patients, and it is recognized as a serious in-hospital complication. It is a complex electrolyte disorder that results mainly from water imbalances and dysregulation of arginine vasopressin. Hyponatremia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality among the elderly and in patients with heart, liver, or neurologic diseases. The following educational module discusses the pathophysiology of hyponatremia, outlines methods for differentiating the cause, and provides examples of how to manage hyponatremia in a variety of situations commonly faced by hospitalists.
Appropriate Use of Targeted Oral Anticoagulants to Prevent Stroke in Patients with Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation: Virtual Patient
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
$0.00 This activity is supported by educational grants from Boehringer Ingelheim and Daiichi Sankyo.
Acute Treatment of Venous Thromboembolic Disease (VTE) – Case 2
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
$0.00 This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from Bristol-Myers Squibb Company.
DOAC Reversal: Patient Management Implications for the Hospitalist
  • AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™
$0.00 Anticoagulant therapy plays a vital role in treating patients and preventing serious and potentially fatal complications resulting from venous thromboembolism (VTE) and atrial fibrillation. Direct acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs), such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban offer several advantages over traditional vitamin K antagonist therapy. Most notably, DOACs have a more predictable anticoagulant response, fewer drug interactions, and significantly less risk of hemorrhagic stroke when compared to warfarin. In the past, the absence of a clear, effective reversal strategy was a concern with the new oral anticoagulant agents. In order to address these concerns, therapeutic agents targeting DOAC reversal have been in development for several years. This case-based enduring module discusses the efficacy and safety of these new and emerging anticoagulation reversal agents as well as recommended strategies for DOAC reversal.

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